Melbourne is the only Australian city to be the top 10 most populous cities in the latest Global Liveability Index

Melbourne is the only Australian city to reach the top 10 in the latest Global Liveability Index – but it could easily have missed something.

According to the latest index, published Thursday by the Economist Intelligence Unit, Vienna is the most habitable city in the world when factors such as stability, health care, education, culture and the environment and infrastructure are taken into account. This is a position that the Austrian capital has held several times.

Vienna is again considered to be the world's most habitable city.

Vienna is again considered to be the world’s most habitable city.

In 2021, Queensland’s performance in handling COVID-19 caused Brisbane to scrape into 10th place, just behind Melbourne (equal to eighth with Singapore), which received a better rating than Queensland’s capital for infrastructure but was marked for health care.

While Sydney failed to reach the top 10 in 2021, Adelaide jumped to third place. The New Zealand cities of Auckland (first) and Wellington (fourth) also did well because they had been spared the worst of COVID-19.

But this year, foreign cities have a better grip on the pandemic, and Australia’s best performance on the index is Melbourne, which has ranked just 10 with Osaka in Japan. Again, a better infrastructure assessment helped lift the Victorian capital, whereas Osaka was considered superior in healthcare.

Brisbane’s time in the sun was short and the Olympic host city in 2032 dropped to a 27th place and passed Sydney (13th) on the road. Adelaide, meanwhile, went from third to 30th place.

Brisbane has slipped out of the top 10 on the Global Liveability Index.

Brisbane has slipped out of the top 10 on the Global Liveability Index.Credit:Rhett Hammerton

New Zealand’s cities fell the most, with Auckland now in 34th place and Wellington in 50th place – below Perth, which is in 32nd place.

The best Australian cities ranked the same in stability, health care and education, with only culture and environment separating Melbourne (98.6 out of 100) and Sydney (97.2).

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